Kim Holleman’s Law of the Land at Black + White Gallery

Kim Holleman: Law of the Land
Black & White Gallery
March 14 – May 25, 2008

Kim’s latest works seem like apparitions from a child’s imagination. Miniature worlds, vintage record players and glittery landscapes fill the whole Black & White gallery space, including the back patio.

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The record pieces were the most visually impressive. Clear attractive colors, contrasting forms, and pop culture associations make them fun and riveting. The fact that there is a whole wall of alternative records with their own toxic landscapes makes them more interesting. I hope someone buys the lot, because they look great as a corner of discs and players.

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“Congratulations on your success” (above) drops a park on a cake. Over the years the letters on the top of the cake seems to have disappeared (maybe it’s my faulty memory), as if it slowly it is reverting to a vegetal state.

A glitter-scape

The glitter-scapes look like they came fresh out of a paint-by-numbers kit and were completed by teenage girls obsessed with glitter. These works continues the tongue-in-cheek flavor of the show. Contrasts abound.
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The satellite dishes were bathed in a feeling of quiet isolation. They seem fresh and vibrant.

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In addition to the work on the walls, the mountain-scape of plastic bags in the back and the columns of enviro-columns with their own soundtrack (though it was hard to hear them at a gallery opening), there were “planted” radio-controlled cars driving through the space.

The enviro-fantasia was a welcome stop…and did I mention the wonderful life-sized “trailer park” parked out front which completed Kim’s artistic eco-topia. The future looks green.

3 responses to “Kim Holleman’s Law of the Land at Black + White Gallery”

  1. All right. I’m feeling it…. a lot.
    BUT at the same time… this feels veeerrrrryyy eerily like Joe Fig.
    What do you think???

  2. Olympia »
    That’s really interesting…but I think his seems to grapple with issues of scale and space rather than environment and personal history. There is a style similarity though, you’ve got a sharp eye.

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